Smell of Camphor, Fragrance of Jasmine - 2000

Directed by Bahman Farmanara

An aging film director, Bahman Farjami (played by the film's director Bahman Farmanara), experiences haunting dreams, family problems, and other assorted chaos while attempting to make his first film in twenty years.

Color, 1 hour 33 minutes, Farsi

Original Title: Bou-ye Kafor, At-re Yass

Watch Trailer (Farsi w/English subtitles), Watch Scene (Farsi w/English subtitles)

Star Rating


Firouzan Rank # 4

Cast


Bahman Farmanara Bahman Farjami
Roya Nonahali Young Woman
Reza Kianian Dr. Arasteh
Valiyollah Shirandami Homayouni
Parivash Nazariye Farzaneh
Firouz Behjat Mohammadi Hegeleh Rental
Hossein Kasbian Abda
Mahtaj Noojoomi Bahman's Sister

Crew


Writer Bahman Farmanara
Director Bahman Farmanara
Producer Morteza Shayesteh
Director of Photography Mahmoud Kalari
Sound Recordist Parviz Abnar
Production Designer Zhila Mehrjui
Editor Abbas Ganjavi
Sound Mixer Parviz Abnar
Music Ahmad Pezhman

Pictures


Director Bahman Farmanara plays his own alter-ego.

Director Bahman Farmanara plays his own alter-ego.

The film frequently cuts to a cleric reading the burial rights.

The film frequently cuts to a cleric reading the burial rights.

Giving a lift to a troubled woman.

Giving a lift to a troubled woman.

Bahman visits his wife's grave and finds that the neighboring plot that he believed he had reserved for himself has been occupied.

Bahman visits his wife's grave and finds that the neighboring plot that he believed he had reserved for himself has been occupied.

Renting a Hedgeleh for his own mock funeral.

Renting a Hegeleh for his own mock funeral.

Bahman's nightmare.

Bahman's nightmare.

Trying to incite a spark of coherence in his senile mother.

Trying to incite a spark of coherence in his senile mother.

An unhealthy heart and a preoccupation with death in his professional and personal life lead to a hallucination in which Bahman attends his own funeral.

An unhealthy heart and a preoccupation with death in his professional and personal life lead to a hallucination in which Bahman attends his own funeral.

Bahman is unhappy with all of the funeral arrangements, including the camera crew's chosen shooting angles.

Bahman is unhappy with all of the funeral arrangements, including the camera crew's chosen shooting angles.

Tossing a stone in the water and watching the ripples.

Tossing a stone in the water and watching the ripples.

DVD


Smell of Camphor, Fragrance of Jasmine DVD Case

Purchase DVD at Amazon.com

External Reviews


By Elvis Mitchell The New York Times

Bahman Farmanara's "Smell of Camphor, Fragrance of Jasmine" has a pixilated charm and, under the surface, a current of despair. Mr. Farmanara's sense of humor flows into this three-part story about Bahman, a filmmaker coming to terms with his own mortality; he could be an Iranian Woody Allen using his own life for scoring laughs off himself.

"Your call is a good thing for a bad day," the depressed Bahman says to his son, who has called him in the section of the film called "A Bad Day." This melancholy lump of a man clutches his left arm in pain, often as he's reaching for a cigarette. His current job isn't generating many thrills for him either; he's making a documentary on Iranian burial rituals for Japanese television. "They pay well," he says to his son. He understands that he has to keep working, though. "When a filmmaker doesn't make films, it's like death," he observes, his blue eyes rimmed with sadness. Continued



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