Deserted Station - 2002

Directed by Ali Reza Raisian

When a young married couple's car breaks down on the way to the Imam Reza shrine at Mashhad, the nearest town yields a peculiar man who can help fix their car so long as the wife takes his place as teacher of the town school.

Color, 1 hour 28 minutes, Farsi

Original Title: Eastghah-e-Matrouk

Watch Trailer (Farsi w/English subtitles), Watch Scene (Farsi w/English subtitles)

Star Rating


Firouzan Rank # 49

Cast


Leila Hatami Wife
Nezam Manouchehri Husband
Mehran Rajabi Feizollah
Mahmoud Pak Neeyat Signal Guard

Crew


Writer Kambozia Partovi
Director Ali Reza Raisian
Producer Hossein Zandbaf
Director of Photography Mohammad Aladpoush
Sound Recordist Parviz Abnar
Production Designer Mohsen Shah Ebrahimi
Editor Hossein Zandbaf
Sound Mixer Fabrice Naud
Music Peiyman Yazdanian

Pictures


The long road to the shrine at Mashhad.

The long road to the shrine at Mashhad.

The photographer husband (Nezam Manouchehri) and sleeping wife (Leila Hatami).

The photographer husband (Nezam Manouchehri) and sleeping wife (Leila Hatami).

Waiting for her husband to bring help.

Waiting for her husband to bring help.

The husband and the very helpful Feizollah (Mehran Rajabi) on their way to obtain spare car parts.

The husband and the very helpful Feizollah (Mehran Rajabi) on their way to obtain spare car parts.

'That's life, one is born and one dies.'

"That's life, one is born and one dies."

The wife sits alone at the deserted train station.

The wife sits alone at the deserted train station.

Saying goodbye to the children.

Saying goodbye to the children.

One day of the wife's presence has profoundly effected the children.

One day of the wife's presence has profoundly effected the children.

Chasing after the car.

Chasing after the car.

Stopping for the children.

Stopping for the children.

DVD


Deserted Station DVD Case

Purchase DVD at Amazon.com

External Reviews


By Ari Siletz www.arisiletz.com

Like many Iranian films, "The Deserted Station" is vulnerable to absurd interpretations by Western reviewers because of its metaphoric nature. Writing for the BBC, Jamie Russell begins his analysis of this spiritually transcendent film with, "The sexual politics of the veil make for haunting viewing in Deserted Station." This film, signposted with clear religious references for the Iranian viewer, is no more about sexual politics than Casablanca is about nightclub ownership. The film is actually a statement about the connection between social consciousness and worship. Continued

By Jeffrey M. Anderson Combustible Celluloid

The two leaders of Iranian film, Abbas Kiarostami and Mohsen Makhmalbaf, have spent a good deal of their time training and helping young filmmakers get started. Makhmalbaf has his own film school, and his wife and daughter have released extraordinary films under his tutelage. Kiarostami has helped out new filmmakers like Jafar Panahi by contributing story ideas and taking "story" credit on films like "The White Balloon" and the recent "Crimson Gold."

Less familiar in the US, filmmaker Ali Reza Raisian also gets a little help from Kiarostami for his latest film, "Deserted Station."

It could be that Kiarostami has the magical touch. His films often consist of simple ideas that can be easily explained in a one or two-sentence pitch, and yet when you sit down to them, they grow much more complex and much more truthful than expected. Continued

By Owen Gleiberman Entertainment Weekly

It's not often you encounter a film that's simultaneously as tedious and moving as "The Deserted Station." In the Iranian desert, a cosmopolitan couple are driving along, presumably from Tehran, in their Chevy Blazer. The man stops to take photographs; the woman, beautiful and pregnant but depressed (she has already suffered two miscarriages), gripes about a neighbor who tweaks her for failing to have had children. Then the car breaks down. Continued



Copyright © 2006-2010 Firouzan Films. All rights reserved.