Daughters of the Sun - 2000

Directed by Maryam Shahriar

A young woman dresses as a man in order to work as a carpet weaver in a nearby village. Things get complicated as her talent is exploited by her boss and a female co-worker falls in love with her.

Color, 1 hour 32 minutes, Farsi

Original Title: Dokhtaran-e-Khorshid

Trailer currently not available, Watch Scene (Farsi w/English subtitles)

Star Rating


No Longer Ranked

Cast


Altinay Ghelich Taghani Ahmangol (Ahman)
Soghra Karimi Belghies

Crew


Writer Maryam Shahriar
Director Maryam Shahriar
Producer Jahanghir Kosari
Director of Photography Homayoun Paivar
Sound Recordist Parviz Abnar
Production Designer Malek Jahan Khazaii
Editor Shahrzad Pouya
Sound Mixer Parviz Abnar
Music Hossein Ali Zadeh

Pictures


Ahmangol (Altinay Ghelich Taghani) prepares for a fateful haircut.

Ahmangol (Altinay Ghelich Taghani) prepares for a fateful haircut.

'Ahman' is quickly noticed by the female weavers.

"Ahman" is quickly noticed by the female weavers.

'Ahman'' and the 'Master.'

"Ahman'' and the "Master."

The girl that Ahman befriends sees 'him' as a way out of her impending marriage to a much older man.

The girl that Ahman befriends sees "him" as a way out of her impending marriage to a much older man.

Ahmangol's new village.

Ahmangol's new village.

The girls have an occasional laugh, to the dismay of the master.

The girls have an occasional laugh, to the dismay of the master.

The overbearing master keeps a constant eye on his workers.

The overbearing master keeps a constant eye on his workers.

Playing a game and haggling over a horse.

Playing a game and haggling over a horse.

The buyer deems the carpet that the girls have been working on worthless.

The buyer deems the carpet that the girls have been working on worthless.

Window to the world.

Window to the world.

DVD


Daughters of the Sun DVD Case

Purchase DVD at Amazon.com

External Reviews


By Dave Kehr The New York Times

"Daughters of the Sun" is being billed as an Iranian "Boys Don't Cry," but it takes a lot of wishful thinking to transform this ponderous, relentlessly grim depiction of social servitude in rural Iran into a Western-style disquisition on identity politics.

As were the 2001 Iranian film "Baran" and last year's "Osama" from Afghanistan, "Daughters of the Sun" is about a teenage girl forced to disguise herself as a boy in order to survive. In the urban "Baran," the girl shaves her head and puts on pants to become an assistant at a construction site, where one of the workers feels strangely attracted to the newcomer. In the gravelly wilderness of "Daughters," it's the young woman's father who cuts off her hair and sends her to a neighboring village to work for a rugmaker, supervising three girls as they patiently weave carpets from thick rolls of dyed wool. Continued



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